Death and STUFF

https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTyZMkwGTO0O_3hQDwIQdZV4LwLnlim387qR25cdaFwsqKe01z72AThis topic has been coming up a lot lately – how to manage all the material stuff we have to deal with – often in the form of lifelong accumulations of elders as they leave it all behind for their descendants to have to handle.

It can be a rather sad (and seemingly endless) affair, going through the possessions of one’s parents down to the minutiae… knowing that much of it held sentimental value to them (and thus of somewhat sentimental to family by proxy)… but having to get rid of it somehow, just the same.

Following is a guest piece from this site, an evolving upbeat & humorous contemplation by Caitlin Doughty, and while I haven’t explored it yet, I’m curious enough to look into it at some point. Meanwhile, this post is not grim – it’s more a light-hearted ode to minimalism. Shout out to Jo for the head’s up.

Hugs, Whitehawk


“To accumulate is to live as if you’re not going to die.”

Guest author (and comedian) Robert Wringham shoves you kicking and screaming into examining the relationship between minimalism and death positivity.

This article is the second thing I’ve written today. The other was my will.

After meeting Caitlin and devouring her work, I’ve decided to come to terms with my pending decomposition. As much as I’d like to live forever, bopping back and forth between Big Bang and Big Crunch in an eternal game of ping-pong, it’s obviously not going to happen. All roads lead to Wormsville.

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